The Organs of Corpus Christi Church
Introduction History Stop list Multimedia Discography

Index of chapters

 1670
 1765 - 1767, Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz
 1912, Otto Heinrichsdorf
 1943 -
 Footnotes and sources




1670
       For the year 1670 Jan Janca already assumes the existence of an organ in the Corpus Christi church[1].

 Back to top of page 

1765 - 1767, Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz
       In the years 1765 - 1767 the organ builder Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz built a new organ. The instrument was located on the choir loft in the west nave of the church and with its 8.4 meters width and 7.65 meters height it filled the entire loft[2].

The organ facade was made out of three towers for 8' pipes, two double interim towers for 4' pipes, ten 2' pipe flats and two sided 6' pipe flats for the pedal voices. The case followed waved lines in both, horizontal and forward-and-back direction. It was painted in light gray and had gilded decoration in the base and top of the towers and flats, and a richly carved gilded socket section underneath the actual towers decorating the front of the loft.
The side towers were decorated with larger-than-life instrument playing angel figures. The central tower was crowned by the “eye of God”decorated with a golden ring around it[3]. The number “1766” is carved into the wood and gilded in the right hand side of the loft.

The organist on this instrument became Johann Ephraim Eggert who recorded the stop list of this and many other instruments in Gdansk around 1800. The stop list for the organ at Corpus Christi church reads as follows[4]:

 
Haput Manual   Rückpositiv [Unterwerk]   Pedal
1. Bourdun Flöt 16'   1. Flöt 8'   1. Subbass Forte 16'
2. Principal Minor 8'   2. Quintadena 8'   2. Principal 8'
3. Principal 8'   3. Principal 4'   3. Holl Flöt 8'
4. Holl Flöt 8'   4. Flaut Amabile 4'   4. Salicinal 8'
5. Flaut Allemannde 8'   5. Flaut Traverse 4'   5. Octava 4'
6. Viol di Gamba 8'   6. Octava 2'   6. Flöt 4'
7. Fugara 8'   7. Wald Flöt 2'   7. Octava 2'
8. Octava 4'   8. Flaschnetto 2'   8. Mixtur 8fach 4'
9. Flöt Douce 4'   9. Mixtur 3fach 2'   9. Posaune 16'
10. Octava 2'   10. Clarione 8'   10. Trompete 8'
11. Swigel 1'     Tremulant          
12. Mixtur 6fach 4'                
13. Dulcian 16'   Additional stops
14. Trompet 8'   Campanarum symphonia (chimes)
        Stella campanarum (1 star with 4 bells, chord G)
        Stella campanarum minor (1 star with 10 bells)
        Stella cimbalorum (1 star with 10 cymbels)
        Cimbalorum piano (One stop with 3 cymbels)
        Paucke 16' ("Timpani", 1 valve, 4 belows)


 Back to top of page 

1912, Otto Heinrichsdorf
       Around 1912 the instrument receives changes from Otto Heinrichsdorf. The new stop list looked as follows[5]:

 
Oberwerk   Rückpositiv [Unterwerk]   Pedal
1. Bourdun Flöt 16'   1. Flöt 8'   1. Subbass Forte 16'
2. Principal Minor 8'   2. Quintadena 8'   2. Principal 8'
3. Principal 8'   3. Salicional 8'   3. Holl Flöt 8'
4. Holl Flöt 8'   4. Portunal-Flöte 8'   4. Salicinal 8'
5. Flaut Allemannde 8'   5. Principal 4'   5. Octava 4'
6. Viol di Gamba 8'   6. Flaut Amabile 4'   6. Flöt 4'
7. Fugara 8'   7. Flaut Traverse 4'   7. Octava 2'
8. Octava 4'   8. Octava 2'   8. Mixtur 8fach 4'
9. Flöt Douce 4'   9. Flaschnetto 2'   9. Posaune 16'
10. Quinte 22/3'   10. Mixtur 3fach 2'   10. Trompete 8'
11. Octava 2'     Tremulant          
12. Mixtur 6fach 4'     Koppel          
13. Dulcian 16'                
14. Trompet 8'   Registration aids
        Campanarum symphonia (chimes)
        Stella campanarum (1 star with 4 bells, chord G)
        Stella campanarum minor (1 star with 10 bells)
        Stella cimbalorum (1 star with 10 cymbels)
        Cimbalorum piano (One stop with 3 cymbels)


 Back to top of page 

1943 -
       In 1943 the organ was dismantled and brought outside of Gdansk to preserve it from war damage. Ironically the church suffered only little damage in 1945 while the organ was raided in its storage place[6].

Later on the surviving organ facade was brought back and rebuilt on its original location in the Corpus Christi church, where it stands without pipes and mechanics until today. Due to lack of funds no plans for a rebuilding the instrument are currently carried out[7].

Following the war a small organ by German organ builder W. Sauer (Opus 316) was located on the loft on the north wall of the north nave. The instrument however is out of order due to a broken blower. Lack of funds are in the way of repairing it. The woodwork inside the instrument show signs of worm attacks[8].

The following is the stop list of the opus 316 Sauer organ[9]:
 
Pedal   Manual   Registration aids
1. Subbass 16'   1. Bordun 16'     Pedal Coppel  
        2. Principal 8'     Collectiv Pedal  
        3. Gedackt 8'     Calcant  
        4. Octave 4'        




Text: Marek Michalak, Cologne, 29 June 2005

 Back to top of page 


Footnotes and sources
1 Renkewitz/Janca, Geschichte der Orgelbaukunst in Ost und Westpreußen zwischen 1333 und 1944, p. 276  
2 Januszajtis, Andrzej, Zapomniane organy w kosciele Bożego Ciała, Gazeta Wyborcza Trójmiasto, 7 January 2005  
3 Renkewitz/Janca, p. 273/274  
4 Renkewitz/Janca, p. 274/275, name modifications based on personal viewing of the organ case on 22 June 2005  
5 Based on Renkewitz/Janca, p. 275  
6 Renkewitz/Janca, p. 275  
7 Interview with R. Michalak, parish priest of Corpus Christi, on 22 June 2005  
8 Information supplied by R. Michalak and personal viewing by the author  
9 Notes from personal viewing by the author  


 Back to top of page 




© Copyright 2004 - 2019 by Gdańskie Organy
No content from this site can be copied, published or linked without our written permission. All Rights Reserved.