The Organs of St. Mary's
Introduction History Stop list Concerts Multimedia Discography

Table of chapters

 1385 - 1468
 1475
 1508 - 1510, Blasius Lehmann
 1522, Hans Hauck
 1523 - 1524, Blasius Lehmann
 1547, Anthonius (Lehmann) of Bautzen
 1582 - 1585, Julius Anthoni (Friese)
 1616, Merten Friese & Ägidus Schubbe
 1652 - 1683, Organ builder family Nitrowski
 1712 - 1735, Andreas Hildebrandt
 1758 - 1760, Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz
 1777 - 1778, Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz
 1869, Carl Schuricht
 1891, Max & August Terletzki
 1895, Otto Heinrichsdorf
 1931, Josef Goebel
 1935 - 1938, Emanuel Kemper
 1945 - 1961
 1979, 1982 - 1985, Hillebrand Brothers



1385 - 1468
       The oldest reference of an organ at St. Mary dates back to the year 1385 with the mentioning of an "Magister organista" who was employed in the basilica. The first organist mentioned by name was Master Paul Schuldte, who worked at the basilica from 1459 till 1468.

 Back to top of page 

1475
       By 1475 the church had three organs: a positive organ in the Reinhold's chapel and the All Saint's chapel, and an organ on the western wall of the main nave, constructed by an unknown builder.

 Back to top of page 

1508 - 1510, Blasius Lehmann
       In the years 1508-1510 the organ builder Blasius Lehmann from Bautzen built a new organ for St Mary.
Lehman first dismantled the existing nave organ and relocated it over the entrance to the All Saint's chapel, thus creating the space required at the west end of the nave for his new organ, which he completed in 1510 and which contained 1926 pipes.
Apparently he did not fully complete his work on the nave organ which, added with the problem of high humidity in the basilica, would require him to return to Gdask 13 years later.
Documents indicate that Lehmann might have constructed a positive organ over the St. Dorothea chapel, but there are no further notes about this instruments in the records.

 Back to top of page 

1522, Hans Hauck
       In 1522 the organ builder Hans Hauck, who was active in Gdask probably already since Lehmann's departure in 1510/1511, was contracted to carry out repair works on the nave organ built by Lehmann. Furthermore, he also constructed a new organ on the loft over the sacristy.
Probably Hauck was asked to make a cost estimate for a repair of the Lehman organ and the parish found it too expansive and hoped to get it done cheaper by Lehmann himself. However, to compensate Hauck for losing an extensive repair contract the parish offered him the construction of a new organ.

 Back to top of page 

1523 - 1524, Blasius Lehmann
       In 1523 Lehmann returned to Gdask to repair and extend his 1510 nave organ. Apart from that Lehmann carried out repair works on the instrument over the entrance to the All Saint's chapel, and he constructed a new organ over the entrance to the Reinhold's chapel at the west end of the northern nave.
The general assumption is that Lehmann did not consider it worthwhile to travel all the way to Gdask just to do some repair works and therefore was offered the construction of a brand new instrument by the parish to make the effort of travelling attractive to him.

With Lehmann's work completed in 1524, St. Mary's Basilica had four instruments at a time, and if the information of Lehmann's organ over the St. Dorothea chapel is true, the basilica would have had even five instruments at that time.

 Back to top of page 

1547, Antonius (Lehmann) of Bautzen
       Antonius of Bautzen, presumably the son of Blasius Lehmann, performed repair and extension works on the main nave organ and the instrument located over the entrance to the All Saint's chapel.

 Back to top of page 

1582 - 1585, Julius Anthoni (Friese)
       In 1582 the city of Gdask secured the services of Julius Anthoni, who later also has been called Julius Anthoni Friese and Anthonius Friese for his origin from Friesland. Active in Hamburg around 1575 and Lübeck around 1579, he got in contact with Gdask and Königsberg (nowadays Kaliningrad) at the same time as he heard that both cities had plans for bigger organ projects.
By 1582 Kouml;nigsberg, during his visit to Gdask, the council of Königsberg informed him that they would like him to built a new organ in the cathedral of Königsberg. The city of Gdask awarded him citizen rights and provided free accommodation to ensure Anthoni would settle in Gdask and not go to Königsberg.
The city council of Knigsberg was not very pleased with the city of Gdask and tried, through mail and personal intervention, to gain Anthoni for Knigsberg, but without any success.

His first commission for St Mary was to perform repairs on the 1522 Hauck organ on the loft and to extend the 1524 Lehmann organ over the entrance to the Reinhold's chapel.
In the process Anthoni dismantled the 1510 Lehmann organ in the main nave and presumably used the pipes and material from that instrument to perform the extensions of the organ over the Reinhold's chapel.

Organ over the entrance to the Reinhold's chapel - Specification after 1582 extension
Hauptwerk
 
Rückpositiv
 
Pedal
Gedackt
16'
  Prinzipal
8'
  Prinzipalbaß
16'
Prinzipal
8'
  Quintade
8'
  Subbaß
16'
Hohlflöte
8'
  Hohlflöte
8'
  Hohflöte
8'
Oktave
4'
  Oktave
4'
  Quintade
4'
Quinte
3'
  Spielflöte
4'
  Quinte
3'
Sedezima
2'
  Blockflöte
4'
  Bauernpfeife
2'
Glöckleinton
1'
  Nasat
3'
  Zimbel
Mixtur     Superoktave
2'
  Mixtur
      Gemshorn
2'
  Trompete
8'
      Zimbel
  Krummhorn
8'
      Mixtur
  Schalmei
4'
      Trompete
8'
  Singend Cornett
2'
      Krummhorn
8'
     
      Singend Regal
4'
     
      Tremulant        


Julius Anthoni satisfied the parish with his work and he was commissioned to build a new great organ in place of the dismantled 1510 Lehmann instrument at the west end of the nave. Anthoni designed a 53 stops instrument an its prospect, which was made by the carpenter Stephan Kelch and sculptor Leo Wiegk.

The construction work on the instrument began in 1583 and considering it only took three years to build an instrument of that size, Anthoni and his journeyman Johann Koppelmann must have had around eighth to ten assistants working on the construction.
The pipes were probably all made out of metal as wooden pipes were not yet common at that time. By 1584 Anthoni started installing the pipes already. But sometime during 1584 an accident happened during construction which claimed his life.
Johann Koppelmann finished the work of his master and delivered it to the parish by 18th October 1585.
On 18th and 19th October a number of rehearsals was organized for which non-local organist were invited to perform. The event was quite social and the sources report people drank wine and played at dice.
The organist Cajus Schmiedlein from Hamburg impressed the people and was hired as organist of St. Mary's which he held in post until his death in 1611.

After analysing the numerous records and documents regarding Anthoni's organ, Werner Renkewitz and Janca have created a reconstruction of the instrument's probable specification.

1585 nave organ specification, reconstructed by Werner Renkewitz and Jan Janca
Oberwerk
 
Rückpositiv
 
Pedal Unten
Principal
16'
  Principal
8'
  Octava
8'
Ged. Hohlflöte
16'
  Ged. Hohlföte
8'
  Gedackt
8'
Quintadena
16'
  Spielflöte
8'
  Spitzquinte
6'
Viol oder Octav
8'
  Viol oder Octav
4'
  Superpctava
4'
Spielflöte
8'
  Blockflöte
4'
  Quintadena
4'
Offenflöte
8'
  Offenflöte
4'
  Nachthorn
2'
Quintadena
8'
  Nasat
3'
  Bauernpfeife
1'
Viol oder Octav
4'
  Sedecima
2'
  Rauschpfeife
3' & 2'
Spielflöte
4'
  Gemshorn
2'
  Mixtur
9x
Sedecima
2'
  Sifflöte
1 1/3'
  Cymbel
6x
Rauschpfeife
3' & 2'
  Waldflöte
1'
  Krummhorn
8'
Cymbel
6x
  Rauschpfeife
3' & 2'
  Schalmay
4'
Mixtur
26x
  Cymbel
5x
  Cornett
2'
Tremulant     Mixtur
2x
     
      Trompete
8'
  Pedal Oben
Brustwerk   Krummhorn
8'
  Unterbaß 32'
Gedackt
8'
  Schalmay
4'
  Unterbaß 16'
Principal
4'
  Halber Zink
4'
  Posaune 16'
Ged. Hohlflöte
4'
        Trompete 8'
Quintadena
4'
           
Detzchen
1 3/5'
  Scope of manuals     Scope of pedal  
Cymbel
3x
  C, D, E - c3     C, D, E - d1  
Regal
8'
           
Zink
4'
           
Tremulant              

It has to be mentioned that "Pedal Unten" and "Pedal Oben" does not refer to two seperate pedalboards, but to two (a lower and an upper) windchest holding the pedal stops.


Based on the notations of Michael Praetorius, Renkewitz and Janca attempted the following reconstruction of the 26-fold mixture from Hauptwerk:

C = 8' - 5 1/3' - 4' - 2 2/3' - 2' - 1 1/3' - 1' - 2/3' - 1/2' - 1/3' - 1/4' two fold of which 1' and 1/2' four-fold
c = 10 2/3' - 8' - 5 1/3' - 4' - 2 2/3' - 2' - 1 1/3' - 1' - 2/3' - 1/2' two fold of which 2', 1' and 1/2' four-fold
c1 = 16' - 10 2/3' - 8' - 4' - 2 2/3' - 2' - 1 1/3' - 1' two fold of which 8', 4', 2' and 1' four-fold
c2 = 21 1/3' - 16' - 10 2/3' - 8' - 5 1/3' - 4' - 2 2/3' - 2' two fold of which 16', 8', 4' and 2' four-fold

Anthoni's organ prospect was a late Dutch renaissance tulip-shaped design with three towers and flat sections in between.
The Hauptwerk consisted of a higher central tower holding seven pipes was surrounded by two vertically separated fields of pipes to the left and right, which connected the central tower to the slightly smaller towers at the sides. Each tower was polygonal, shaped from a decagon.
The Rckpositiv, which was worked into the balustrade of the gallery, had the same shape.
The Hauptwerk towers had cupola shaped crowns with big wooden figures on their top showing King David on the central tower and an angel playing an instrument on each of the two side towers. The Rckpositiv showed Moses on the top of the central tower and an angel on each of the side towers.
The front pipes of the towers and the fields stood on a solid socket which follows the outline of the towers and fields in shape. Beneath the towers the socket was decorated with figure shaped reliefs while under the fields the socket decoration showed figures standing under the arc of a niche.
Each of the side towers had slim blades of carefully carved wood on their outside.

 Back to top of page 

1616, Merten Friese & Ägidus Schubbe
       The next work on St. Mary organs was done by Anthoni's son, Merten Friese, and gidus Schubbe in 1616. They both added a pedal division to the 1522 Hauck organ on the loft.

 Back to top of page 

1652 - 1683, the organ builder family Nitrowski
       The organ builder Georg Nitrowski was contracted by 1652 to perform a substantial repair on the Anthoni organ.
Nitrowski returned to St. Mary's again in 1672 when he was to carry out another repair of the 1524 Lehmann organ over the entrance to the Reinhold's chapel.

In 1673 Nitrowski and his son Andreas made a restoration of the Anthoni organ. They were assisted by Johann Balthasar Held, who was to become a student of Arp Schnitger a couple of years later.
The work on the Anthoni organ most probably included a complete overhaul of most of the wind chests and the pipes. In course of the modifications the 26x mixture from Hauptwerk was eliminated.

Specification of the main nave organ in 1673 after the Nitrowski modification
Oberwerk
 
Rückpositiv
 
Pedal
Principal
16'
  Principal
8'
  Unter-Satz
32'
Hohlflöte
16'
  Flöte
8'
  Sub-Baß
16'
Quintadena
16'
  Spiel-Flöte
8'
  Gedact
16'
Octava
8'
  Salicional
8'
  Salicional
16'
Salicional
8'
  Quintadena
8'
  Octava
8'
Hohlflöte
8'
  Octava
4'
  Hohlflöte
8'
Spiel-Flöte
8'
  Wald-Flöte
4'
  Quintadena
8'
Octava
4'
  Super-Ocatva
2'
  Super-Octava
4'
Offene Flöte
4'
  Gemshorn
2'
  Rausch-Quinta
3'
Sedecima
2'
  Quinta
3'
  Bauer Flöte
2'
Quinta 3
2'
  Nasat
3'
  Sexta
2'
Spitz Quinta
1 1/2'
  Mixtur
6x
  Mixtur
11x
Mixtur
11x
  Trommete
8'
  Posaune
16'
      Krumhorn
8'
  Trommete
8'
      halber Cornet
8'
  Krumhorn
8'
Brustwerk         Schallmey
4'
Principal
4'
        Cornett
2'
Gedact
8'
           
Quintadena
4'
           
Flöte
2'
           
Schwiegel
1'
           
Regal
8'
           


By 1683 the brothers Andreas and Daniel Nitrowski were contracted for yet another attempt to repair the 1524 Lehmann organ which by then was already labelled "the damned" for the difficulty to play it, its susceptibility to malfunction and its resistance to repairs.

 Back to top of page 

1712 - 1735, Andreas Hildebrandt
       The local organ builder Andreas Hildebrandt is assumed to have carried out repair works on the old organ over the All Saint's chapel by 1712.

In 1727 Hildebrandt was asked to write a report about the condition of the Anthoni organ, on which he performed maintenance work in 1734-1735.

 Back to top of page 

1758 - 1760, Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz
       Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz was the next one to carry out work on the Anthoni organ in the years 1758-1760.
Dalitz most probably performed an overhaul on most of the wind chests and rearranged the position of stops. Apart from that he renamed some of the existing stops and changed the intonation of some others rather than building all the new stops from scratch.
Furthermore Dalitz overhauled, if not changed, the entire action of the instrument and replaced the keys on the manuals.

There is some doubt about whether or not Dalitz had commissioned the construction of an entirely new prospect or if he only requested to repair some damaged casework.
The sources and research done on this issue do not explicitly state either alternative and are in parts contradictory.
Some records say the prospect was worm-eaten and required a total rebuilt, while some records talk about different styles of carving, indicating the prospect was modified at a later stage after construction but not rebuilt.
If Dalitz had in fact commissioned a new prospect it can be assumed that shape and proportions were based on and very similar to Anthoni's original work.

Specification of the main nave organ in 1760 after the modification by F. R. Dalitz
Oberwerk
 
Rückpositiv
 
Pedal
Principal
16'
  Principal
8'
  Contra Baß
32'
Quintadena
16'
  Flauto
8'
  Principal
16'
Flaut Major
16'
  Flaut allamande
8'
  Subbaß
16'
Octava
8'
  Quintadöna
8'
  Violone
16'
Flaute
8'
  Salicinal
8'
  Quinta major
10 2/3'
Viol di Gamba
8'
  Fugare
8'
  Octava
8'
Octava
4'
  Octave
4'
  Flauto
8'
Flaut
4'
  Flaut Traversa
4'
  Octava
4'
Quinta
3'
  Flaut amabile
4'
  Quinta
3'
Octava
2'
  Quinta
3'
  Flagolett
1'
Mixtur
11x
  Octava
2'
  Sexquialter
13/5'
Cimbel
3x
  Mixtur
9x
  Mixtur
10x
Fagotto
16'
  Dulcian
16'
  Cimbel
3x
Vox Humana
8'
  Trompet
8'
  Trombone
32'
Campanetta
  Zincke
8'
  Posaune
16'
            Tromba
8'
Ober-Clavier   Toy Stops   Schalmey
4'
Flaut
8'
  Campanetta     Cornetto
2'
Principal
4'
  Cimbel Stern        
Quintadöna
4'
  Timpani        
Quinta
3'
  Vocatur        
Schwiegel
1'
  Aperta        
Regal
8'
  Noli me tangere        


 Back to top of page 

1777 - 1778, Friedrich Rudolf Dalitz
       In 1777 and 1778 Rudolf Friedrich Dalitz dismantled three instruments at once: The 1522 organ on the loft, the 1524 organ over the entrance to the Reinhold's chapel and the 1475 organ over the entrance to the All Saint's chapel.
Into the freed space on the choir gallery Dalitz built a completely new instrument with case. The case consisted of five towers, 3 big and two small ones, with pipe fields in waved form in between.
On the three high towers there were larger-than-life angel figures with trumpets which were initially moveable through a mechanism.
On top of each of the two smaller towers in between a Cimbelstern was mounted.

Specification of the 1778 Dalitz choir organ
Manual
 
Pedal
Bourdun
16'
  Subbaß per forsch
16'
Principal
8'
  Principal Baß
8'
Hohflöte
8'
  Flöt gedackt
8'
Flaut Travers (Disc.)
8'
  Saliconal
8'
Quintadöna
8'
  Octava
4'
Viol di Gamba
8'
  Offne Flöt
4'
Octava
4'
  Octava
2'
Flaut amabile
4'
  Mixtur
6x
Quinta
3'
  Dulcian
16'
Octava
2'
  Trompet
8'
Waldflöte
2'
     
Mixtur
5x
     
Trompet (Bas disc.)
8'
  Cimbelsterne, Tremulant,  
      Sperr Ventil, Calcant, 4 Belows  
Manual scope     Pedal scope  
C - d3     C - d1  


 Back to top of page 

1869, Carl Schuricht
       The next organ maintenance work was done in 1869 by Carl Schuricht, who carried out an overhaul of the great organ in the main nave and changed Flageolett 1' in the Pedal to a 2' stop.

 Back to top of page 

1891, Max & August Terletzki
       In 1891 the great organ underwent major changes by the company of August Terletzki from Elblag.
Terletzki built a completely new instrument with pneumatic action into the case of Anthoni/Dalitz. The front pipes of Rckpositiv were muted and Rckpositiv and Brustwerk were entirely stripped off their pipes and left empty.
Terletzki's new organ was a 56-stop instrument with romantic specification and intonation, having more unisons and fewer aliquots.

 Back to top of page 

1895, Otto Heinrichsdorf
       The organ on the loft was modified soon after, in 1895. Otto Henrichsdorf added a pneumatic second manual with five stops to the organ. The wind pressure was increased to cope with the new manual chest and the the instrument was changed significantly in terms of intonation. Careless treatment in the following years led to a quick decay of the instrument.

 Back to top of page 

1931, Josef Goebel
       Josef Goebel changed the intonation of the great organ in 1931, moving the instrument slightly away from its romantic sound by adding more overtones.

 Back to top of page 

1935 - 1938, Emanuel Kemper
Lbeck based company of Emanuel Kemper started changing the great organ in 1935.
The muted Rckpositiv pipes were connected to to the wind chests, and Rckpositiv and Brustwerk were populated with pipes again.
Some pipes and wind chests from Terletzki's organ were modified and reused.
Kemper installed a total of 88 stops with baroque style disposition. By 1938 Kemper started to strip the choir organ off it pipes. Following that a totally new instrument was installed into the 1777 Dalitz case on the choir gallery with 32 stops on pedal and two manuals, also with baroque style specification.
The choir organ was linked through electric cables to the console of the main organ so that both instruments could be played from one console.
A coupled total of 120 stops and 8176 pipes made the organ again the biggest instrument in the Baltic region and attracted many visitors to the concert evenings.

 Back to top of page 

1945 - 1961
The war robbed both instruments from Gdask.
The great have organ, which was long considered the finest organ and had no match in the Baltic region1 went down in the big city fire in March 1945. Only approximately one third of the prospect survived the flames.
The choir organ on the loft was completely destroyed.

In 1961 a big, electronic Wurlitzer Organ was gifted to St. Mary's by polish people abroad in the U.S., and and the instrument was placed on the loft.
However, considering the importance of the church, this instrument and its location were not satisfying on a long term view.


 Back to top of page 

1979, 1982 - 1985, Hillebrand Brothers
The organ case from St. John's church, built 1625-1629 by Anthoni's son Merten Friese, survived the war and was handed to St. Mary's basilica in 1979 by the city curator.
Gdansk born surgeon Dr. Otto Kulcke from Frankfurt a. M., Germany, founded a supporting association to raise funds for the restoration of the instrument.
The restoration of Merten Friese's organ became a Polish-German joint venture.

The Polish part was to restore the beautiful organ case and place it on a balcony which was to be placed on the west end of the main nave.
Approximately 90% of the wooden decoration have survived the the war and their later storage and the missing parts carpenter had to reconstruct was thus small.

The German part of the joint venture would supply a brand new instrument and fit it into the restored case.
For this purpose the company of brothers Harry and Guntram Hillebrand from Isernhagen, near Hannover, was contracted.

The principle leading the work on the new instrument was to faithfully reconstruct the sound of the old Merten Friese organ. Together with the organ expert Helmut Winter a specification concept was designed which was based on the instrument's original renaissance specification of 1629.
The Hillebrand brothers have performed acoustical measurements in the huge St. Mary's basilica and found out that the church reinforced low pitch voices and adsorbed high pitch voices. For this reason the principle stops of the Hauptwerk and Rckpositiv received a second rank from c1 onwards.
The instrument was designed with a tracker action, mechanical registration action, and slider chests.
The pipes were treated according to historical customs with hammering and thinning out the material to achieve the desired tonal characteristics.
The covers of the stopped pipes were soldered to the pipe bodies. All reed pipes were made according to 17th century methods of construction.
Based on historical examples, the wind supply to the chests was achieved through wedge-shaped bellows.

From the original organ of Merten Friese the front pipes, which were the entire Prinzipal 8' from the Rckpositiv and the Prinzipal 16' from the Hauptwerk, were preserved. Only the seven tallest pipes from the Hauptwerk (Prinzipal 16') were missing and had to be rebuilt.
In 1983 already The Hillebrand brothers installed the first part of the organ with 25 stops and made them able to use already.
The rest of the instrument was assembled during the succeeding months and on 18th August 1985 at 12:00 the organ with 46 stops on three manuals and pedal was officially opened.

Specification of the 1985 Hillebrand Organ:

Specification of the 1985 Hillebrand organ
Brustwerk
 
Hauptwerk
26 Gedackt
8'
  8 Prinzipal
16'
21 Traversflöte
8'
  38 Oktave
8'
27 Prinzipal
4'
  39 Hohlflöte
8'
22 Gedackt
4'
  9 Spillpfeife
8'
28 Spitzflöte
2'
  10 Oktave
4'
23 Terz
1 3/5'
  40 Spillflöte
4'
29 Quinte
1 1/3'
  11 Quinte
2 2/3'
24 Sifflöte
1'
  12 Oktave
2'
25 Regal
8'
  41 Sesquialtera
2x
30 Schalmey
4'
  42 Mixtur
7x
        13 Trompete
16'
             
Rückpositiv
 
Pedal
15 Prinzipal
8'
  1 Prinzipal
16'
16 Gedackt
8'
  44 Subbas
16'
31 Quintadena
8'
  2 Oktave
8'
17 Oktave
4'
  45 Gedackt
8'
32 Rohrflöte
4'
  46 Quinte
5 1/3'
18 Nasat
2 2/3'
  3 Oktave
4'
19 Okatve
2'
  47 Quintade
4'
33 Waldflöte
2'
  48 Bauernflöte
1'
20 Scharff
5x
  4 Mixtur
5x
34 Zimbel
4x
  49 Posaune
32'
35 Trompete
8'
  5 Posaune
16'
36 Dulcian
8'
  50 Trompete
8'
        6 Cornett
4'
             
Playing Aids
7 Rp/Ped.     51 Hw/Ped.  
14 Rp/Hw     T1 Tremulant  
37 Zimbelstern     T2 Tremulant-Rp  
43 Bw/Hw          
             
Manual scope:     Pedal scope:  
C, D - d3     C - f1  


Allignment of draw knowbs
Ped
Hw
Rp
Bw
Bw
Rp
Hw
Ped
8
37
1
44
9
 
38
2
15
 
31
45
10
21
 
26
39
3
16
 
32
46
11
22
 
27
40
4
17
 
33
47
12
23
 
28
41
5
18
 
34
48
13
24
 
29
42
6
19
 
35
49
14
25
Manual 3
30
43
7
20
Manual 2
36
50
T2
Manual I
T1
51
The Prinzipal stops of the Hauptwerk and Rckpositiv sound substantially different, thus giving each of the two divisions a separate characteristic sound.
The Prinzipal 16' of Hauptwerk is made of an zinc-lead alloy. By contrast, the Prinzipal 16' from Pedalwerk is made of wood which gives the two equally name stops a different character of sound.
The Mixture 7x from Hauptwerk and Zimbel 4x from Rckpositiv break down in octave distances on every c-key.
The Scharff 5x from Rckpositiv breaks down in quint distances on every c- and g-key.
The organ is equal tempered and has a base pitch of a1 = 440 Hz. The wind pressure used is 88mm water column.

A very interesting effect involves the two 8' flutes on the second manual (Hauptwerk): Hohlpfeife 8' and Spillpfeife 8'.
When each is played individually they sound like an 8' stop. However, when both are engaged at the same time they sound changes pitch upwards by one octave, sounding like a 4' stop.

Apart from regular voicing (as any instrument requires) the Hillebrand organ has not required any repair or overhaul yet

Asked about specific characteristics of the current instrument, Boguslaw Grabowski, organist at St. Mary since 1985, told me that in his opinion the instrument has no weak spots or negative characteristics, but that it is very well done considering the targets that were set for its construction.
Talking about the best characteristics Mr. Grabowski mentioned the intonation of the organ in first place, which he considers to be very good. He is also very pleased with the mensur of the pipes applied by the Hillebrand brothers, the composition of the mixtures, and the way in which the individual stops combine with each other when engaged together.
Asking about the wind supply of the instrument, Mr. Grabowski told me that in all the time since 1985 it only happened once to him that the organ ran short of wind, while holding an exam with a student who played a piece of Max Reger with all 46 stops engaged.
Apart from this one incident there have never been any problems with the wind supply.

To come to an end, let's consider the following quote by Dr. Otto Kulcke regarding this instrument:
"We kindly ask future generations to preserve it the way it is designed, and not to change its character and uniqueness through improper or just fashionable appearing modifications of its specification or mechanics"


As of 9 May 2004

 Back to top of page 




© Copyright 2004 - 2018 by Gdańskie Organy
No content from this site can be copied, published or linked without our written permission. All Rights Reserved.